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Translation


JACK HACKER
 

I have a German birth record where it lists the godfathers name (last name Corneluis) and then the following word which I think is an occupation. Don't know if I spelled it right. Can anyone help with a translation?

Hofintendant

Thanks,
Carole Heyde-Hacker


John W. Kitz <John.Kitz-gen@...>
 

Carole,

 

Needless to note that the most appropriate translation is dependent on the context in which the word "Hofintendant" is used. Since the context isn't provided, in general I'd refer you to e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intendant_(disambiguation). while "Hof" might refer to a royal or a judicial court and in some cases it might also refer to a farm of sorts.

 

Regars, Jk.

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of JACK HACKER
Sent: Sunday, 05 July, 2020 23:33
To: german-genealogy-ENG@groups.io
Subject: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

I have a German birth record where it lists the godfathers name (last name Corneluis) and then the following word which I think is an occupation. Don't know if I spelled it right. Can anyone help with a translation?

 

Hofintendant

 

Thanks,

Carole Heyde-Hacker


davidrli@...
 

G’day Carole

 

Ernst Thode’s German-English Genealogical Dictionary describes a “Hof” as an “estate; manor; farm; homestead”.

 

So a “Hofintendant” would be the bailiff or steward of an estate, i.e. managing an estate on behalf of the owner, collecting the rents from the tenant farmers etc.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of JACK HACKER
Sent: Sunday, 05 July, 2020 23:33
To: german-genealogy-ENG@groups.io
Subject: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

I have a German birth record where it lists the godfathers name (last name Corneluis) and then the following word which I think is an occupation. Don't know if I spelled it right. Can anyone help with a translation?

 

Hofintendant

 

Thanks,

Carole Heyde-Hacker


John W. Kitz <John.Kitz-gen@...>
 

Carole,

 

Again, AFAIK the meaning of the word hof (with one 'f' that is : ) in German as well as in Dutch is to some extent dependent on the context in which it has been or is being used. E.g. the word hof in Hofmedikus des Fürsten (...) means that someone was a personal physician to the (house of the) rulers/sovereign of (...). There are numerous websites that provide for translations, such as https://dict.leo.org/englisch-deutsch/Hof and https://www.deepl.com/de/translator#de/en/Hofintendant.In other words I'd look at the entire text in which the word is used or even at the broader context, assuming you have found more than one certificate or other text on the same individual.

 

Regards, Jk.

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of davidrli@...
Sent: Monday, 06 July, 2020 02:25
To: Germany List
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

G’day Carole

 

Ernst Thode’s German-English Genealogical Dictionary describes a “Hof” as an “estate; manor; farm; homestead”.

 

So a “Hofintendant” would be the bailiff or steward of an estate, i.e. managing an estate on behalf of the owner, collecting the rents from the tenant farmers etc.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of JACK HACKER
Sent: Sunday, 05 July, 2020 23:33
To: german-genealogy-ENG@groups.io
Subject: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

I have a German birth record where it lists the godfathers name (last name Corneluis) and then the following word which I think is an occupation. Don't know if I spelled it right. Can anyone help with a translation?

 

Hofintendant

 

Thanks,

Carole Heyde-Hacker


Kathryne Natale
 

-----Original Message-----
From: JACK HACKER <cajalz@...>
To: german-genealogy-ENG@groups.io <german-genealogy-ENG@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jul 5, 2020 5:32 pm
Subject: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

I have a German birth record where it lists the godfathers name (last name Corneluis) and then the following word which I think is an occupation. Don't know if I spelled it right. Can anyone help with a translation?

Hofintendant

Thanks,
Carole Heyde-Hacker


Ernst Mettlach
 

Carole, 
According to the Deutsches Rechtswörterbuch, a Hofintendant is an administrative officer at the court. https://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~cd2/drw/e/ho/fint/enda/hofintendant.htm
Regards, 
Ernst

Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 06.07.2020 um 17:20 schrieb John W. Kitz <John.Kitz-gen@...>:

Carole,

 

Again, AFAIK the meaning of the word hof (with one 'f' that is : ) in German as well as in Dutch is to some extent dependent on the context in which it has been or is being used. E.g. the word hof in Hofmedikus des Fürsten (...) means that someone was a personal physician to the (house of the) rulers/sovereign of (...). There are numerous websites that provide for translations, such as https://dict.leo.org/englisch-deutsch/Hof and https://www.deepl.com/de/translator#de/en/Hofintendant.In other words I'd look at the entire text in which the word is used or even at the broader context, assuming you have found more than one certificate or other text on the same individual.

 

Regards, Jk.

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of davidrli@...
Sent: Monday, 06 July, 2020 02:25
To: Germany List
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

G’day Carole

 

Ernst Thode’s German-English Genealogical Dictionary describes a “Hof” as an “estate; manor; farm; homestead”.

 

So a “Hofintendant” would be the bailiff or steward of an estate, i.e. managing an estate on behalf of the owner, collecting the rents from the tenant farmers etc.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of JACK HACKER
Sent: Sunday, 05 July, 2020 23:33
To: german-genealogy-ENG@groups.io
Subject: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

I have a German birth record where it lists the godfathers name (last name Corneluis) and then the following word which I think is an occupation. Don't know if I spelled it right. Can anyone help with a translation?

 

Hofintendant

 

Thanks,

Carole Heyde-Hacker


davidrli@...
 

G’day Carole and Ernst

 

The question remains, what “court”?  It would be very easy to simply assume that the court in question is an earlier version of a modern criminal court simply involving itself with administering justice.  However, America still uses the “Courthouse” as the administrative centre of a county, whereas In England and Australia, we use “Council House” or “Council Chambers” and in Germany you have the “Rathaus”.

 

The household officers (Chamberlains, Keeper of the Privy Purse etc) of a sovereign or a member of the nobility are his “court”.

 

In medieval times, the basis for wealth was the ownership of land; these estates being worked by tenant farmers, or serfs.   In England these large estates are referred to as “Manors” and I believe the equivalent in German is the “Hof”.  Apart from the day to day collection of rents etc, the work also involved the administration of tenant inheritances, the owner of an estate being entitled to a Fee when a tenant’s son inherited the farm from his deceased father as well as minor social disciplinary matters.  The administrative centre and legal basis of these estates was the “Manor Court” with a steward or bailiff being responsible for the day to day work, the “Hofintendant” being the German equivalent.

 

This situation lasted well into the 19th century when land and local administrative reforms were enacted in many countries in Europe.  So unless there is evidence to suggest otherwise, (e.g. a criminal judicial function), I would start with the idea that a Hofintendant is the administrative officer of a large estate or “manor”.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io <main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ernst Mettlach
Sent: Thursday, 9 July 2020 11:48 PM
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io; John.Kitz-gen@...
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

Carole, 

According to the Deutsches Rechtswörterbuch, a Hofintendant is an administrative officer at the court. https://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~cd2/drw/e/ho/fint/enda/hofintendant.htm

Regards, 

Ernst


John W. Kitz <John.Kitz-gen@...>
 

Carole, et al,

 

I believe whoever sent you this https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA272 link to a page on which the name Konr[ad]. Cornelius is mentioned along with the position of Hofintendant did so to indicate that a gentleman with the name Konrad (or Conrad) Cornelius during some time held the position of Hofintendant in the royal household of the Kurfürstentum Hessen (in English the Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel, see e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electorate_of_Hesse and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landgraviate_of_Hesse-Kassel).

 

As for the book; it starts here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PP12.

 

The section on (the genealogy of) Kurhessen starts here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=PA241-IA1 and ends here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=PA270. Another section of the book deals with the household (in German Hofstaat) of Kurhessen. That section starts here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA270 and ends here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA276.

 

On this https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA272 page within the section on the royal household of the Kurfürstentum Hessen under "D. Hofstaat (household) der Kurprinzessin nebst dem der Prinzessinnen Karoline und Marie" (roughly translated as Household of the Electoral Princess next to those of the Princesses Karoline and Marie) you'll see the names:

 

·         Kammerherr (Chamberlain or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamberlain_(office)) Major Karl Wilhelm August v[on]. Osterhausen;

·         Hofdamen (Court ladies, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady-in-waiting) Fräul[ein]. Marie v[on]. Stockhausen and Fräul[ein]. Sophie v[on]. Scheel;

·         Hofintendant (Princess' (or Prince's Office Director) Konr[ad]. Cornelius.

 

Caveat: Translations made by a non-German-and-non-English-native.

 

I hope this helps, regards, Jk.

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of davidrli@...
Sent: Saturday, 11 July, 2020 04:32
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io; ernst.mettlach@...
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

G’day Carole and Ernst

 

The question remains, what “court”?  It would be very easy to simply assume that the court in question is an earlier version of a modern criminal court simply involving itself with administering justice.  However, America still uses the “Courthouse” as the administrative centre of a county, whereas In England and Australia, we use “Council House” or “Council Chambers” and in Germany you have the “Rathaus”.

 

The household officers (Chamberlains, Keeper of the Privy Purse etc) of a sovereign or a member of the nobility are his “court”.

 

In medieval times, the basis for wealth was the ownership of land; these estates being worked by tenant farmers, or serfs.   In England these large estates are referred to as “Manors” and I believe the equivalent in German is the “Hof”.  Apart from the day to day collection of rents etc, the work also involved the administration of tenant inheritances, the owner of an estate being entitled to a Fee when a tenant’s son inherited the farm from his deceased father as well as minor social disciplinary matters.  The administrative centre and legal basis of these estates was the “Manor Court” with a steward or bailiff being responsible for the day to day work, the “Hofintendant” being the German equivalent.

 

This situation lasted well into the 19th century when land and local administrative reforms were enacted in many countries in Europe.  So unless there is evidence to suggest otherwise, (e.g. a criminal judicial function), I would start with the idea that a Hofintendant is the administrative officer of a large estate or “manor”.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io <main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ernst Mettlach
Sent: Thursday, 9 July 2020 11:48 PM
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io; John.Kitz-gen@...
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

Carole, 

According to the Deutsches Rechtswörterbuch, a Hofintendant is an administrative officer at the court. https://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~cd2/drw/e/ho/fint/enda/hofintendant.htm

Regards, 

Ernst


John W. Kitz <John.Kitz-gen@...>
 

Carole, et al,

 

A final word of caution; as the saying goes there are more doggy's names fify or fido. This is why I wrote a gentleman names Konrad (or Conrad) Cornelius rather than the gentleman named Konrad (or Conrad) Cornelius shown in the genealogy you sent to this list.

 

To be able to state with some level of confidence that the gentleman in your genealogy and the gentleman named in the book on the Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel were one and the same individual obviously requires more documentation. On that note; the name Konrad Cornelius also appears here https://books.google.nl/books?id=NAJTAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA387 in this https://books.google.nl/books?id=NAJTAAAAcAAJ&pg=PP5 book, in which Konrad Cornelius is listed as steward (or rent manager) and (presumably at some later point in time) head steward (or rent manager) of a geographical area in Kurhessen referred to in the book as 45) Renterei Zierenberg, consisting of a place known as Amt Zierenberg and about 21 villages listed in the book.

 

Enjoy your weekend, regards, Jk.

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of John W. Kitz
Sent: Saturday, 11 July, 2020 11:45
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

Carole, et al,

 

I believe whoever sent you this https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA272 link to a page on which the name Konr[ad]. Cornelius is mentioned along with the position of Hofintendant did so to indicate that a gentleman with the name Konrad (or Conrad) Cornelius during some time held the position of Hofintendant in the royal household of the Kurfürstentum Hessen (in English the Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel, see e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electorate_of_Hesse and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landgraviate_of_Hesse-Kassel).

 

As for the book; it starts here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PP12.

 

The section on (the genealogy of) Kurhessen starts here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=PA241-IA1 and ends here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=PA270. Another section of the book deals with the household (in German Hofstaat) of Kurhessen. That section starts here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA270 and ends here https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA276.

 

On this https://books.google.de/books?id=V-QRAAAAYAAJ&hl=de&pg=RA1-PA272 page within the section on the royal household of the Kurfürstentum Hessen under "D. Hofstaat der Kurprinzessin nebst dem der Prinzessinnen Karoline und Marie" (roughly translated as Household of the Electoral Princess next to those of the Princesses Karoline and Marie) you'll see the names:

 

·         Kammerherr (Chamberlain or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamberlain_(office) ) Major Karl Wilhelm August v[on]. Osterhausen;

·         Hofdamen (Court ladies, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady-in-waiting) Fräul[ein]. (Miss) Marie v[on]. Stockhausen and Fräul[ein]. (Miss) Sophie v[on]. Scheel;

·         Hofintendant (Princess' (or Prince's) Office Director) Konr[ad]. Cornelius.

 

Caveat: Translations made by a non-German-and-non-English-native.

 

I hope this helps, regards, Jk.

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io [mailto:main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io] On Behalf Of davidrli@...
Sent: Saturday, 11 July, 2020 04:32
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io; ernst.mettlach@...
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

G’day Carole and Ernst

 

The question remains, what “court”?  It would be very easy to simply assume that the court in question is an earlier version of a modern criminal court simply involving itself with administering justice.  However, America still uses the “Courthouse” as the administrative centre of a county, whereas In England and Australia, we use “Council House” or “Council Chambers” and in Germany you have the “Rathaus”.

 

The household officers (Chamberlains, Keeper of the Privy Purse etc) of a sovereign or a member of the nobility are his “court”.

 

In medieval times, the basis for wealth was the ownership of land; these estates being worked by tenant farmers, or serfs.   In England these large estates are referred to as “Manors” and I believe the equivalent in German is the “Hof”.  Apart from the day to day collection of rents etc, the work also involved the administration of tenant inheritances, the owner of an estate being entitled to a Fee when a tenant’s son inherited the farm from his deceased father as well as minor social disciplinary matters.  The administrative centre and legal basis of these estates was the “Manor Court” with a steward or bailiff being responsible for the day to day work, the “Hofintendant” being the German equivalent.

 

This situation lasted well into the 19th century when land and local administrative reforms were enacted in many countries in Europe.  So unless there is evidence to suggest otherwise, (e.g. a criminal judicial function), I would start with the idea that a Hofintendant is the administrative officer of a large estate or “manor”.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io <main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ernst Mettlach
Sent: Thursday, 9 July 2020 11:48 PM
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io; John.Kitz-gen@...
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

Carole, 

According to the Deutsches Rechtswörterbuch, a Hofintendant is an administrative officer at the court. https://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~cd2/drw/e/ho/fint/enda/hofintendant.htm

Regards, 

Ernst


Ernst Mettlach
 

David,
you`re right with the etymological explanation of Hof. Hof in german can be a court, a building, a yard or simply a farm (Hof is short for Bauernhof). But in this case, you`re wrong. Hofintendant is clearly defined and mentioned in many dictionaries and contemporary sources as the highest ranking administration officer of a court. One dictionary I mentioned above, a contemporary source ist the "Allgemeines Europäisches Staats- und Address-Handbuch" by Johann Georg Heinrich Hassel which described the various german courts in the 19th century. There are hundreds of more sources, many of them online. The "Hofintendanz" was an institution on every german court and consisted of the Oberhofmeister/Oberhofintentant and the Hofintendant they were responsible for the economy of the court (they were often members of the nobility themselves) and several lower ranks. 
Contrary to this, the german equivalent of the stewart of a manor (Gut or Gutshof or Hofgut in german) in the sense of a big farm was, depending on the status, region and owner of the manor, called Verwalter, Gutsverwalter, Meier (or derivatives like Mayer, Meyer etc), Drost, Amtmann, Schultheiss, Schulze, Hofmann, Vogt or Ökonom, in medieval sources you can also find the latin Maior domus.   
The institution "Intendanz" or the the title "Intendant" refers in historical sources exclusively to a court or the military. Until 1945, the imperial army and later the Wehrmacht had a so called "Intendantur" (same meaning as Intendanz) with a Generalintendant https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intendantur
Today, the word is widely obsolete in german, the only exception: In theaters,operas, big radio or television stations the artistic and business director is usually called Intendant.
Regards from Trier/Germany to beautiful Australia!
Ernst

Am Sa., 11. Juli 2020 um 04:31 Uhr schrieb <davidrli@...>:

G’day Carole and Ernst

 

The question remains, what “court”?  It would be very easy to simply assume that the court in question is an earlier version of a modern criminal court simply involving itself with administering justice.  However, America still uses the “Courthouse” as the administrative centre of a county, whereas In England and Australia, we use “Council House” or “Council Chambers” and in Germany you have the “Rathaus”.

 

The household officers (Chamberlains, Keeper of the Privy Purse etc) of a sovereign or a member of the nobility are his “court”.

 

In medieval times, the basis for wealth was the ownership of land; these estates being worked by tenant farmers, or serfs.   In England these large estates are referred to as “Manors” and I believe the equivalent in German is the “Hof”.  Apart from the day to day collection of rents etc, the work also involved the administration of tenant inheritances, the owner of an estate being entitled to a Fee when a tenant’s son inherited the farm from his deceased father as well as minor social disciplinary matters.  The administrative centre and legal basis of these estates was the “Manor Court” with a steward or bailiff being responsible for the day to day work, the “Hofintendant” being the German equivalent.

 

This situation lasted well into the 19th century when land and local administrative reforms were enacted in many countries in Europe.  So unless there is evidence to suggest otherwise, (e.g. a criminal judicial function), I would start with the idea that a Hofintendant is the administrative officer of a large estate or “manor”.

 

Regards

 

David Armstrong

 

Maylands

Western Australia

 

 

From: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io <main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ernst Mettlach
Sent: Thursday, 9 July 2020 11:48 PM
To: main@German-genealogy-ENG.groups.io; John.Kitz-gen@...
Subject: Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] Translation

 

Carole, 

According to the Deutsches Rechtswörterbuch, a Hofintendant is an administrative officer at the court. https://www.rzuser.uni-heidelberg.de/~cd2/drw/e/ho/fint/enda/hofintendant.htm

Regards, 

Ernst


RstewartDudley
 

Excellent mail !

RM Stewart

RMS

On Jul 12, 2020, at 05:58, Ernst Mettlach <ernst.mettlach@...> wrote:

source