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Anna Maria Fröhlich

Patti
 

Hi Janice,

I would think this is the same person. The Germans used multiple names when naming their kids. Usually a saint's name, sometimes a second name and then the "ruf" name - the name they were called in their everyday lives. Some of mine have FIVE given names. Some of my family named their kids ALL the same saint's name! So ALL the boys might have been named Johann something something then the surname. Same with the girls. In fact it got so bad that I started CAPITALIZING their ruf names. Given that, I think your two Maria's are one and the same.

Best,

Patti Hacht
Lakeville, Michigan
USA

Heidi Arno
 

Jan and All
Re your Maria . . . .In my husband's genealogy, in the marriage records of the town, early 1800's, two couples marry where both the bride's name and the groom's name are the same, both weddings within the same calendar year.  All four parties have different parents, of course.  But which ones moved to Milwaukee and are my husband's ancestors?    If these two weddings had not been so close in time to each other I probably would have never noticed, and gone with the first one I found.  So few name choices, so many children in these European villages.  

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 12:55 AM Patti <duncaha@...> wrote:
Hi Janice,

I would think this is the same person. The Germans used multiple names when naming their kids. Usually a saint's name, sometimes a second name and then the "ruf" name - the name they were called in their everyday lives. Some of mine have FIVE given names. Some of my family named their kids ALL the same saint's name! So ALL the boys might have been named Johann something something then the surname. Same with the girls. In fact it got so bad that I started CAPITALIZING their ruf names. Given that, I think your two Maria's are one and the same.

Best,

Patti Hacht
Lakeville, Michigan
USA



--
Heidi Hennig Arno

Lila Garner
 

In that case you’ll usually find a death of one of the four fairly soon, ruling out one couple. 


On Jul 24, 2020, at 9:53 AM, Heidi Arno <heidiarno@...> wrote:

Jan and All
Re your Maria . . . .In my husband's genealogy, in the marriage records of the town, early 1800's, two couples marry where both the bride's name and the groom's name are the same, both weddings within the same calendar year.  All four parties have different parents, of course.  But which ones moved to Milwaukee and are my husband's ancestors?    If these two weddings had not been so close in time to each other I probably would have never noticed, and gone with the first one I found.  So few name choices, so many children in these European villages.  

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 12:55 AM Patti <duncaha@...> wrote:
Hi Janice,

I would think this is the same person. The Germans used multiple names when naming their kids. Usually a saint's name, sometimes a second name and then the "ruf" name - the name they were called in their everyday lives. Some of mine have FIVE given names. Some of my family named their kids ALL the same saint's name! So ALL the boys might have been named Johann something something then the surname. Same with the girls. In fact it got so bad that I started CAPITALIZING their ruf names. Given that, I think your two Maria's are one and the same.

Best,

Patti Hacht
Lakeville, Michigan
USA



--
Heidi Hennig Arno