Date   

Enhancements to this mailing list's site

W David Samuelsen
 

I added several new links to the main page of this mailing list


I am working through each subgroup to add essential links.

Hanover is done, but are there any essential links I missed?

Will take some time to do the rest of the subgroups (local mailing lists)

W David Samuelsen, GL 


Re: "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Nanette
 

I found this book about the Pennsylvania Dutch Language.  It may help with other unusual words that are specific to a particular dialect.

Diminutives in Pennsylvania Germans (PG). and Suabian are made with-li; both use 'des' for das, 'uffm' for auf dem, 'biirǝ' for birnen, 'g'hat' or 'kat' for gehabt, 'suu˛' for sohn, 'schoof' for schâf, 'Schwop' for Schwâbe, 'als' for alles, and 'as' for als.

And 'uffr' would be ‘auf der’.

Someone was asking about Pennsylvania germans and this book talks about them also:


-Nanette



Info about Hashtags

Nanette
 

Hello Everyone,
There still seems to be some confusion about how hashtags help and how to use them.  I've written up some info that will hopefully shed some light on the subject.  
If you have further questions, please feel free to respond to me only.  I'll collect the new info and send an update to all, so everyone doesn't get barraged with this topic.


About Hashtags
Hashtags have been set up for each region in today's Germany as well as old Germany's provinces and colonies (prior to 1947). Messages to the group may be assigned Up to 5 hashtags to identify the region(s) involved in the message. 
 
What Hashtags Can Do for You:
- you can indicate the region you are researching. 
- you can search on posts relating to a specific hashtag (see below).
- you can mute hashtags that you are not interested in and you will not see emails with those hashtags (see below).
- you can introduce yourself to the group by including hashtag #intro in the subject line of a message that describes your interests and ancestry questions. Example subject line: “My name is Mark #intro"
 
To set Hashtag on a Message:
Hashtags are set by including them in the subject line of a message. The subject line should include the family name(s) and the pertinent hashtag(s) (up to 5) that you are interested in. Hashtags should be placed at the end of the subject line. Example subject line: “Family Falkenberg Prior to 1890 #westprussia”.  or more concisely "Falkenberg Prior to 1890 #westprussia”.  By putting the hashtag on the subject line, people not interested in those regions will not even get the message. By putting the family name(s) on the subject line, people can easily disregard the message without having to open it and read it.
 
To Search on a Particular Hashtag:
Hashtags can be searched on to easily find all messages tagged with it. You may search on any active hashtag, muted or not.
1. log into group.io
2. on left select “# Hashtags"
3. for each region that you are interested in, click in the large box surrounding it.
Alternatively,
1. log into group.io
2. on left select “Messages"
3. Select the desired region from the light blue “# Hashtags” drop down menu at the top of the list of messages.
 
To configure the hashtags you are interested and those you wish to mute:
Hashtags act as a filter for which email you receive from the group. You will only receive emails of messages with hashtags you have not muted. If a message has only hashtags you have muted, it will not be sent to you. You may still search on muted hashtags (see above).
1. log into group.io
2. on left select “# Hashtags"
3. for each region that you are not interested in, click “Mute” then set the preferred Duration and click the blue ”+ Mute” button. 

So, please include hashtag(s) on your subject line and the family name if message about that family.  If it's a message of general interest, you can eliminate family or hashtags as you wish.

Happy hunting!
-Nanette
 


Re: #WestPrussia #WestPrussia

RstewartDudley
 

Looks like you just did.....

RMS

On Jan 31, 2020, at 15:24, Lorri Buschmann <Phillylorri@...> wrote:

I want to post to this site an I dont know how?


Re: #WestPrussia #WestPrussia

McCarthy J & L
 

And I also want to post, but it is not showing up.

 

 

You just did.

 

Just write your message what you are looking for and post in a new message and be sure there is no space in hashtags.

 

David Samuelsen

 

On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 3:39 PM Lorri Buschmann <Phillylorri@...> wrote:

I want to post to this site an I dont know how?


Re: #WestPrussia #WestPrussia

W David Samuelsen
 

You just did.

Just write your message what you are looking for and post in a new message and be sure there is no space in hashtags.

David Samuelsen


On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 3:39 PM Lorri Buschmann <Phillylorri@...> wrote:
I want to post to this site an I dont know how?


Re: #WestPrussia #WestPrussia

Lorri Buschmann <Phillylorri@...>
 

I want to post to this site an I dont know how?


#WestPrussia #WestPrussia

Mary Jane Kuntschik
 

Schrotz and Rose Deutsch Krone to Hildesheim, Brandenburg 1859 - 1900

Streich, Schuhmann, Gast, Urbanski



Re: Betr.:Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records

Bill Willis
 

The question being asked was what was the meaning of uffr and uffm

You answered a different question

On Jan 31, 2020, at 4:47 AM, efhensel via Groups.Io <efhensel@...> wrote:

I already told you it is simpls   "Auf dem" or Auf der = Engl.  at the ....

Am 31.01.2020 06:56:54 Mitteleuropäische Zeit schrieb list@...:

Ernest Thode's book has "uff - on"
Not as a prefix, but as a complete word. I suppose it is a variation of
'auf'

Mona Houser



On 01/30/2020 09:16 PM, Lila Garner wrote:
> I googled uffr uffm and found a church book entry similar to what you
> describe. When I downsized my Ernest Thode dictionary went into storage.
> Does any have a copy to consult?
>
>
> On Jan 30, 2020, at 9:02 PM, Rüdiger Maluck <r.maluck@...
> <mailto:r.maluck@...>> wrote:
>
> It probably could simply mean a cottage nearby the next village, his or
> her homestead, where they were living.
>
> Regards
>
> Ruediger
>
> Am 30.01.2020 um 19:06 schrieb onadayofwindandrain@...:
>> I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for
>> the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
>> I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as)
>> "Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a
>> "prefix".
>>
>>
>> I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix"
>> uffr or uffm.
>> I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late
>> as c1750.
>> I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.
>>
>> Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are
>> something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning
>> "Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"
>>
>> Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Bill


Betr.:Re: [German-genealogy-ENG] "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records

efhensel@...
 

I already told you it is simpls   "Auf dem" or Auf der = Engl.  at the ....

Am 31.01.2020 06:56:54 Mitteleuropäische Zeit schrieb list@...:

Ernest Thode's book has "uff - on"
Not as a prefix, but as a complete word. I suppose it is a variation of
'auf'

Mona Houser



On 01/30/2020 09:16 PM, Lila Garner wrote:
> I googled uffr uffm and found a church book entry similar to what you
> describe. When I downsized my Ernest Thode dictionary went into storage.
> Does any have a copy to consult?
>
>
> On Jan 30, 2020, at 9:02 PM, Rüdiger Maluck <r.maluck@...
> <mailto:r.maluck@...>> wrote:
>
> It probably could simply mean a cottage nearby the next village, his or
> her homestead, where they were living.
>
> Regards
>
> Ruediger
>
> Am 30.01.2020 um 19:06 schrieb onadayofwindandrain@...:
>> I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for
>> the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
>> I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as)
>> "Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a
>> "prefix".
>>
>>
>> I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix"
>> uffr or uffm.
>> I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late
>> as c1750.
>> I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.
>>
>> Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are
>> something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning
>> "Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"
>>
>> Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Bill
> _._,_._,_



Re: #Bavaria - Feiner emigrant #Bavaria

Wanda
 

Andreas Hofer,

I have not researched my Feiner line beyond my great grandfather. I do not know if Feiner Johann from Waldmünchen is part of his family (or not). Thank you for the offer to find his birth information, but it is not needed at this time.


Re: "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Bill Willis
 

Mona

That would make sense, as the "auf den” prefix is common, particularly in the form “Auß”—though i would think “Auß” would be the equivalent of “Auss” not “Auff”
And that still doesn’t get to the additional “r” or “m” in Uffr and Uffm.

Bill

On Jan 31, 2020, at 12:56 AM, Knittin' Nana <list@sandyview.net> wrote:

Ernest Thode's book has "uff - on"
Not as a prefix, but as a complete word. I suppose it is a variation of 'auf'

Mona Houser



Re: "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Knittin' Nana <list@...>
 

Ernest Thode's book has "uff - on"
Not as a prefix, but as a complete word. I suppose it is a variation of 'auf'

Mona Houser

On 01/30/2020 09:16 PM, Lila Garner wrote:
I googled uffr uffm and found a church book entry similar to what you
describe. When I downsized my Ernest Thode dictionary went into storage.
Does any have a copy to consult?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 9:02 PM, Rüdiger Maluck <r.maluck@t-online.de
<mailto:r.maluck@t-online.de>> wrote:

It probably could simply mean a cottage nearby the next village, his or
her homestead, where they were living.

Regards

Ruediger

Am 30.01.2020 um 19:06 schrieb onadayofwindandrain@gmail.com:
I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for
the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as)
"Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a
"prefix".


I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix"
uffr or uffm.
I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late
as c1750.
I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.

Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are
something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning
"Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"

Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?

Thanks

Bill
_._,_._,_


Re: "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Lila Garner
 

I googled uffr uffm and found a church book entry similar to what you describe. When I downsized my Ernest Thode dictionary went into storage. Does any have a copy to consult?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 9:02 PM, Rüdiger Maluck <r.maluck@...> wrote:

It probably could simply mean a cottage nearby the next village, his or her homestead, where they were living.

Regards

Ruediger

Am 30.01.2020 um 19:06 schrieb onadayofwindandrain@...:
I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as) "Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a "prefix".  


I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix" uffr or uffm.
I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late as c1750.
I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.

Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning "Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"

Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?

Thanks

Bill


Re: "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

r.maluck@...
 

It probably could simply mean a cottage nearby the next village, his or her homestead, where they were living.

Regards

Ruediger

Am 30.01.2020 um 19:06 schrieb onadayofwindandrain@...:

I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as) "Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a "prefix".  


I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix" uffr or uffm.
I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late as c1750.
I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.

Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning "Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"

Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?

Thanks

Bill


German Genealogy in Pennsylvania

carl zadroga
 

MINDERJAHN
GREIM
REIS
LEISTER
HETRICK
REITER
SOUDER
GROMAN
 
 
Immigrated to Philadelphia ,Pa from 1750 Lived in Philadelphia Co. Montgomery Co. and Bucks Co.


"prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Bill Willis
 

FYI, in response to several private responses to my query, here’s some additional information.

1.  The database I’m looking at is "Rhineland, Germany, Lutheran Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1610-1925” at Ancestry
if you have an ancestry subscription, the link is https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/61246/?name=_Hof&event=1670&count=50&event_x=10-0-0_1-0&name_x=1_s that gives the results for a search using “Hof” as the search key.

2.  Here’s a table generated from that search.  Instances of Uffm and Uffr are highlighted in gold.  Note that sometimes Uffm is used with a womans name, and sometimes with a man’s name.  And vice versa.

3.  As it happens the surname I’m working on [In Den Hoffen] seems to have numerous variants (surprise!) including
Auf dem Hoff, 
Auf dem Hoffen, 
Auf dem Hof
but there are lots more.

4. A suggestion was made that the prefix (either spelling?) means something like 
" cottage nearby the village,”  

That makes sense in the context of Auf Dem Hof etc.  since Hof=courtyard, or perhaps in this case farm-yard.
so perhaps uffr and uffm are sort of a short hand for Auf den Hof, but there seems to be a distinction between uffr and uffm—perhaps der vs den?
My german is a bit rusty for that sort of distinction.  Didn’t know it might apply in surnames.  

Note that the examples above are all from around 1660 to 1680.  I’ve seen a few more uses with other surnames from later, but not many, and all are confined to the Muelheim-Duisenberg area

The marriage of the specific individual I’m looking at gives his name as Evert Inden Hoffen —which surname might be derived from “in the hope of”—ie a religious connotation.

The baptismal records for his children give the surname as Auf den Hoff—which sort of implies something like "from the farmyard”
In other families with the same basic surname it’s written  “Auß den Hof”—“outside the court”?

By the way, what I’m really doing here is trying to gauge what the original surname might have been.
There are an awful lot of variations in the American records, and even more in the German records, and I can’t tell which represents the same surname, and which are just very similar.  Different candidates for Evert’s father, for instance, seem to be represented by different variants.  
I’m hoping that by teasing out the original surname (if there is such a thing) I may get a handle on who his father was.

Bill







Re: "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Elizabeth Kraus
 

Hello Bill
Can you please give us some examples e.g. a scan? It depends in what context these abbreviations/prefixes have been used. It could mean of this parish?
Regards
Elizabeth
 

Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 5:06 AM
Subject: [German-genealogy-ENG] "prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records
 
I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as) "Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a "prefix". 


I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix" uffr or uffm.
I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late as c1750.
I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.

Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning "Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"

Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?

Thanks

Bill


"prefixes" uffr and uffm in marriage records #Rheinland

Bill Willis
 

I'm looking at a dataset of German marriage records on Ancestry, for the area of Muelheim an der Ruhr in modern North Rhine Westphalia.
I'm looking in particular at surnames that take the form (such as) "Inden Hoffen" "Aus den Hoffen", etc. that include what I'm calling a "prefix".  


I've found a number of records (perhaps 20) that insert the "prefix" uffr or uffm.
I find them mostly between 1660 and 1680, but I've seen some as late as c1750.
I ONLY find them in the Muelheim area, and nearby Duisberg.

Since I only find them in marriage records I'm wondering if these are something that a clerk may have inserted--say with the meaning "Unmarried Woman", "Unmarried man"

Can anyone tell me what uffr and uffm meaning?

Thanks

Bill


Re: From Rose/ Behle/ Schneidemühl/ to Sandau. #Posen

Mary Jane Kuntschik
 

I am also looking for information in Schneidemühl  - surnames Schuhmann and Warnke.

I have copy of Catholic baptismal record for Philipp Jacob Szumann (Schuhmann) born 28 March 1867 in Malinchen and baptized 7 April 1867 in Schneidemühl.

Philipp's mother was Susanna Szumann, nee Warnke, who died  in Malinchen before 1891 the year of Philipp's first marriage in Sandau.- so record of her death would more than likely be  in  Catholic church records in Schneidemuhl.  Philipp married a second time 1899 in Sandau where he lived out his life.

Philipp's father is shown as Anton Szumann who was a 'renter' in Rose, Deutsch Krone, in 1891 and by 1899 had emigrated to the US.  Susanna may have been connected to the Jacob Warnke family of Behle.

I have the beginning of my Schuhmann family tree in Rose, Deutsch Krone where Andreas Schuhmann,  (son of Anton and Anna Elizabeth Zahn of Kappe) . Deutsch Krone, was born 8 Nov 1826, who marries (Caecilia) Julianna Warnke, daughter of Jacob Warnke and Dorothea Beinke of Behle.  Place and date of marriage not known.  Julianna was born 24 Nov 1822.  

I  have their first child as Andreas born 1850 in Wissulke, Deutsch Krone, but no Anton listed among their 7 children. and no Anton listed as son of Anton and Anna Elizabeth Zahn.

Does anyone on the list have knowledge of these families?

Mary Jane Kuntschik
Dallas, TX   USA










On Thursday, January 30, 2020, 10:45:06 AM CST, Ian Farry <farry5@...> wrote:


Hello listers

This is to test posting to the list, & to put my areas of interest on the record.

 

Surnames of interest are ( in priority) LEHMHASE  ;  FUHRMANN  ;  MULLER

The period of research includes (at least) 1750 to 1870

Principal places of research are:

Schneidemuhl  and  Chodziez  in Posen Province  --   in the period 1860 to 1870

Landsberg , Neumark   --   around 1820s’ and 1830s’

          Jerusalem, Berlin Stadt, Brandenburg   --   around 1750s’ and earlier

 

I am interested to hear from other listers who also have research with either names or place mentioned.

Ian  Farry

Brisbane,  Aust

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